why are the electrical connectors glued into place?

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Jab136
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why are the electrical connectors glued into place?

Postby Jab136 » Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:21 am

I am currently having a large amount of difficulty reconnecting an electrical connector on the back of the build plate of my N2+ that was dislodged during a print failure. This difficulty is due to glue that was applied at the factory, however the connector has a mechanical holding mechanism and the glue seems redundant and can lead to issues during maintenance or any other activity that could require the connector to be disconnected and re-connected. Here is an image of the connector in question.
IMG_20170924_160649.jpg
I already have a separate thread to discuss fixing my issue, I am simply creating this one to suggest that in the future, the glue may not be necessary.

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Brandon
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Re: why are the electrical connectors glued into place?

Postby Brandon » Wed Sep 27, 2017 4:54 pm

Thank you for the input. I will pass it on.

Jab136
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Re: why are the electrical connectors glued into place?

Postby Jab136 » Fri Sep 29, 2017 1:39 pm

Brandon wrote:Thank you for the input. I will pass it on.

I would like to update this thread, during attempted repairs by the technician at my lab, the connector that was still connected in the image above broke off, and due to the glue the failure point of the connector was not at the pin connection, but was moved to the solder point which caused a more severe failure. I am now waiting on the re-seller that we purchased it from to come to the lab to make the repair.

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walshlg
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Re: why are the electrical connectors glued into place?

Postby walshlg » Mon Oct 02, 2017 12:42 am

Yeh, the big problem is that the latch for these high current connectors doesnt latch properly

Jab136
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Re: why are the electrical connectors glued into place?

Postby Jab136 » Fri Oct 06, 2017 9:06 am

so you are saying that even without any glue, the larger of the two connectors will not fully latch into place? that was the issue that the technician was having when he accidentally ripped the smaller connector out of the build plate...

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Steven.W
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Re: why are the electrical connectors glued into place?

Postby Steven.W » Fri Oct 06, 2017 8:12 pm

Hey Jab!
Just wanted to start by saying thanks a lot for the feedback, we're always looking for creative ways to solve practical problems. Like you said, we understand gluing the connecting end to the fixture may seem redundant. The reason we're currently exercising this practice is because we want to make sure nothing is knocked around too badly during the shipping process. Same concept as zip tying most wires together, as much as we could theoretically get away without doing it, we're noticing considerably less issues during shipping after making these adjustments.
As a growing company we may find some other (more convenient to us closet technicians) method for safe transit, but as of right now we're doing our best to keep our babies safe!
Steven Whalen
Raise3D

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Mecha_Monster
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Re: why are the electrical connectors glued into place?

Postby Mecha_Monster » Sun Oct 08, 2017 12:30 am

Jab136 wrote:I am currently having a large amount of difficulty reconnecting an electrical connector on the back of the build plate of my N2+ that was dislodged during a print failure.


That's interesting. I had a close call with that connector due to a filament spool that felt into the machine. anything that falls or is dragged by the nozzle will find easier to go trough the gap between the back of the printer and the buildplate, just where that glue connector is situated.
The filament spool that felt hit the connector and bet it, it still works but that was a really close call.
I worked for many years in an electric harness wiring company, so I know a lot of connectors. Maybe Raise should try to go for threaded metal connectors attached to a cord. the cord + metal threaded connector, that's a tough and reliable connection.

Vice Chief
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Re: why are the electrical connectors glued into place?

Postby Vice Chief » Sun Oct 08, 2017 6:28 am

Hey Jab136,

In the electronics industry, connectors and components are routinely glued in place with a variety of substances. These substances range from PDMS (silicone) to hot-melt adhesives (Urethanes, polyamides), to toughened epoxies. In the industry this is known as "staking" and "potting".

The #1 cause of electronic failure for connectors is shock and vibration. The purpose of gluing a component or a connector in place is to secure it from the effects of vibration. For example, a transformer or conductor may have a heavy copper coil over a ferrite core. The only connection it has to the PCB is tiny solder leads - almost like tiny stilts. Another example is the connector on your heated bed. It flexes continuously for every single print you ever make; even under normal operation it is subject to the vibration from the print head for every single movement and acceleration of the print head assembly.

While this vibration may not seem significant, it is not the whole story. Somewhere in China, there is a factory where these printers are produced. They are packed in a box and thrown in a truck, which drives over public roads to a dock somewhere. The pallets full of printers are loaded into a shipping container by semi-skilled labor, and then loaded onto a container ship which travels across the ocean through all kinds of weather. It probably arrives in the port of Los Angeles where a crane lifts up the container, drops it on a semi truck, and sends it through the pothole-filled roads of LA until it hits some warehouse somewhere, where it is again unloaded by some forklift operator. It eventually makes it onto a UPS truck, again by people who don't give a damn, which travels across the US highway system until it reaches you.

(please understand, I believe Raise3D does an excellent job of packaging their printers and shipping their printers, the above is just to point out that there are many points along the way in which no one has adequate control).

Imagine the shock and vibration that the printer is subject to during that trip. Continuously for days on end, punctuated by drops and bangs. It's subject to a trans-atlantic/pacific ocean trip; it's subject to freight trucks, forklifts, potholes, and people who don't know any better. It's a significant amount of vibration that can undo any connection inside the machine. It's not just connectors; you often see the fasteners "walking out" under vibration; this is totally normal if they're not secured with a locking compound. Which is why Raise3D use a locking compound on their screws.

I hope that everyone here can appreciate that securing connectors and components is a best practice in the electronics industry for good reason. It's a good choice by Raise3D and one that should make the machines more reliable overall. However, they can always do better. They might consider using an adhesive that can allow for easier servicing (like hot melt adhesives that can be removed with alcohol). If anything, they should be gluing more, not less.

In aerospace this is a really big deal. So much so that NASA has issued standards for workmanship on staked components. It's worth a read - scroll to page 30 for interesting pictures.

Daniel

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Mecha_Monster
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Re: why are the electrical connectors glued into place?

Postby Mecha_Monster » Sun Oct 08, 2017 7:23 pm

Glue is a widely used absolution, but I think that goes against a machine that requires ease of repair.

Vibration is an issue, but I have seen a lot of electrical wire harnesses of heavy duty machines that relies on a threaded connectors for a solid wire connection.

Bellow: an example of an electric wire harness of a motor, which uses a threaded connector to ensure a proper connection.

MER84-866337T01.jpg

firesped
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Re: why are the electrical connectors glued into place?

Postby firesped » Sun Oct 08, 2017 11:57 pm

just to note that mine was glued in place and my printer is early bird kickstarter printer.
RL name: Michael Nolen
printers:
raise3D N2 kickstarter Early Bird
Trinus Deluxe (running smoothieware on Azteeg X5 GT board)
Monoprice Maker Select v2


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