Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

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caxton3d
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby caxton3d » Thu Feb 16, 2017 4:43 pm

Jason, I am confused now.
Why is IdeaMaker therefore telling me that the model is outside the printable area?

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This is the size that I am trying to print. I have selected a raft 10mm larger all round the model, so my maximum width is 300mm.
Should I be able to print this?

Thanks for your help.
Pattern making for the restoration of vintage Dennis Fire Engines

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jmp
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby jmp » Thu Feb 16, 2017 8:05 pm

First do a test, create a model that is square in x and y (say 200x200) and a few mm thick. Then select model->auto fit to build volume. In my case it set the size of the model to 304x304. Try it both with raft on and raft off to see what you get. If you get the full build volume then maybe your model was rotated?
RL Name: Jason Preuss Thingiverse: JMP Youtube:http://youtube.com/c/patterntoprint Website: http://www.patterntoprint.com

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walshlg
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby walshlg » Fri Feb 17, 2017 3:13 pm

also check the printable area box so you can see where the problem is, I had problems at the back of my prints.

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Vicky@Raise3D
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby Vicky@Raise3D » Wed Feb 22, 2017 2:18 am

Both left and right nozzle can print 305*305mm when you use them separately. 0-305 in X for left and 25-330 in X for right.
If you are using dual, the crossing area where left and right can both reach is only 280 in X (25-305) and 305 in Y.

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Vicky@Raise3D
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby Vicky@Raise3D » Wed Feb 22, 2017 2:26 am

caxton3d wrote:Jason, I am confused now.
Why is IdeaMaker therefore telling me that the model is outside the printable area?

Image

This is the size that I am trying to print. I have selected a raft 10mm larger all round the model, so my maximum width is 300mm.
Should I be able to print this?

Thanks for your help.

You model seems to close to the left and rear sides. The model itself is inside the printing area but with a 10mm offset raft, the raft is over the printing range at left and rear sides.
Please move the model to the center place.

gutenberg3d
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby gutenberg3d » Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:29 pm

I can now bring up to date the story of the patterns for the water manifold, but first this was one of the diversions along the way.

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This was printed and then painted with 'Pattern Coat' which is a 2 part epoxy paint/filler. It is easy to rub down and makes the surface of the pattern smoother for easy extraction from the sand. Below are pictures of the part cast in iron by the Bridport (UK) foundry. They said it was one of the best printed patterns that they had seen!

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As you can see all the detail was faithfully reproduced in the iron.

caxton3d
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby caxton3d » Thu Sep 14, 2017 2:47 pm

There has been a delay in printing the core boxes, as there has been diversions along the way. Here is a printed pattern for a throttle/ignition quadrant which is located around the steering wheel;

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The print has been painted with 'Pattern Coat' which is a 2 pack epoxy paint/filler to give a smoother surface. It is essential in sand casting that the pattern is perfectly smooth so that it can be pulled from the sand easily.

This is the part back from the foundry cast in grey cast iron. The foundry said it was the best printed pattern that they had ever seen!

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The foundry that was used is in Bridport (UK).
Pattern making for the restoration of vintage Dennis Fire Engines

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Brandon
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby Brandon » Thu Sep 14, 2017 3:27 pm

Great Work!

caxton3d
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby caxton3d » Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:36 pm

The next diversion was some printed patterns so that 2 silencer end caps could be cast. The end cap looked like this;

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You will see that all the dimensions are fractional imperial sizes, befitting something which was designed in 1910. The actual part needs what are called 'core prints' adding to it. These will make an extra additional depression in the sand, for the sand 'core' to rest in. The core is needed as we need a hollow part not a solid lump of metal.

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The darker red/brown part is the core located in the sand mold.

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We need to print both the actual part with the core prints and a 'core box' which will produce the sand cores. Everything needs to be split in half, so there was quite a lot of printing. This is one half of the main mold from Ideamaker.

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This is one of the core boxes being printed. There is no significance to the red/black colour change, I just ran out of red filament! Notice the smooth concave surface which will require the minimum of finishing before it can be used by the foundry.

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The final set of prints are shown below.

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These patterns are now at he foundry and the end caps are being cast at this very moment in grey cast iron. I think it is easy to gain the impression when looking at this forum that 3D printing is just about printing 'toys'. One hundred years ago (and even today) patterns like this would have been made in wood by craftsmen of immense skill. 3D printing on a large format printer such as the Raise brings pattern making into the hands of the likes of me who have little or no woodworking skills.
Pattern making for the restoration of vintage Dennis Fire Engines

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Julia Truchsess
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby Julia Truchsess » Fri Sep 15, 2017 10:13 pm

Amazing and beautiful work, thanks for sharing!

caxton3d
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby caxton3d » Mon Sep 25, 2017 12:57 pm

These are the castings back from the foundry. They are cast in grey cast iron. As you can see the surface finish is excellent. As always with 'split patterns' there is a bit of 'flash' along the split line, but this is easily cleaned off with a grinder.

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It is unfortunate that the real world engineering advantages of 3D printers is overshadowed by the perception that they are only used for the printing of cartoon novelties.
Pattern making for the restoration of vintage Dennis Fire Engines

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Brandon
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby Brandon » Mon Sep 25, 2017 3:06 pm

Good work. It is a example of the printers ability as well as your own. Thank you for this.

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walshlg
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby walshlg » Thu Sep 28, 2017 10:17 pm

awesome stuff

caxton3d
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby caxton3d » Thu Nov 02, 2017 11:29 am

We are back to pattern printing. This time it is for a 'spider' which forms part of a flexible coupling linking the gearbox to the rear wheels.
This is the drawing for the part. Draft angles of 2 and 5 degrees have been included to make the pattern easier to withdraw from the sand.

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This is the part still on the printer. You will see that I have only used support for the flat bases of the 3 peripheral bosses and the central boss. As the taper is relatively shallow on all the other surfaces I hoped that they would print without support.

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The finished part turned out well and the support strategy was relatively successful. For the first time I decided to use 'dense support layers' to give a cleaner smoother surface to the supported areas. What puzzles me is how these layers are different to conventional print layers so that they can be broken away at the boundary. Is there any means of improving how easily the 'dense support layer' my be broken away? I struggled in doing so with this print.

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The print now has to be painted with 'Pattern Coat' and rubbed down to give a smooth surface so that it can easily withdrawn from the sand. Then it is off to the foundry for the print to be used for an SG iron casting.
Pattern making for the restoration of vintage Dennis Fire Engines

ABH
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby ABH » Thu Nov 02, 2017 5:38 pm

Really exceptional work presented here. Thank you for sharing.

caxton3d
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby caxton3d » Fri Nov 03, 2017 5:53 pm

ABH, thank you for you kind words. When I see Raise promoting a competition for the best printed Halloween mask I just wonder whether they have their marketing strategy all wrong. It seems that they are promoting their printers as 'toys' to print more 'toys'.

When I suggested to an Engineering Director that his company should purchase a Raise printer for prototype work his response was that he wanted to print 'real work' and not models of Mickey Mouse!
Pattern making for the restoration of vintage Dennis Fire Engines

Vice Chief
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby Vice Chief » Fri Nov 03, 2017 9:51 pm

Caxton3D, I agree wholeheartedly. I think the Raise3D printers offer great value. In one of my jobs, I bought a Fortus 450, and also several Raise printers. The Raise machines were close enough in quality for 95% of our prints, and around 1/30th the price. Plus, since they weren't "precious" machines, more engineers were allowed to use them and experiment with them, and they produced tons and tons of parts. None of those parts were Mario figurines or cosplay stuff. I like that stuff -- but outside of Hollywood, where I am, it is not engineering business. Many of the best alternatives (like a Prusa or Lulzbot) are out of the question because they don't meet basic safety standards (like having an enclosure).

Corporate environments often have few limits on purchases below a threshold- that's often $5K. If you look at the strategy being taken by Bantam Tools (targeting engineering professionals vs makers), I think you see the same idea. There are a lot of corporate engineers and small shops that could use a tool like this, if it were presented as an engineering-grade useful tool.

It's really fantastic to see the castings you've created. My dad is a vintage car enthusiast and hot rodder. I'm going to send him this thread; I know he'll be excited to see your work.

Would you elaborate a little on the cost of castings like these? Or explain how they are priced?

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Vicky@Raise3D
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby Vicky@Raise3D » Sun Nov 05, 2017 6:51 am

Thanks for your suggestions for our marketing strategy! All your using experience sharing and comments here are most valuable fortune for us.
As your said, our products is positioning as a machine which is capable to fulfill prototyping, engineering production. The majority of our customers from those files. But some just also happen to service activities like Halloween prize.

caxton3d
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Re: Patterns for Aluminium Sand Casting

Postby caxton3d » Mon Nov 06, 2017 10:59 pm

Vice Chief, it is nice to know that I am not alone in thinking that the Raise printers have a future in the Engineering Sector. They just need to push more in that direction.

I am based in the U.K. and use the 'Bridport Foundry' ( you can easily find their website ). They are a small family run foundry who are quite happy to do one offs at modest cost. The throttle quadrant cost £20 and the exhaust end caps were £40 each. Their pricing seems primarily based on the weight of the casting rather than the complexity of the pattern. The exhaust cap required a core made in 2 halves and the moulding used a split pattern.

I should add that I printed both of these patterns for a friend who is rebuilding rust and fresh air into an early World War One Thornycroft lorry. If your Dad has a day to spare he might like to look at;

http://hmvf.co.uk/topic/9672-ww1-thorny ... storation/

for once started he will not be able to put down this story of ingenuity and old fashioned engineering skills, re-creating something with only basic machine tools in a home workshop. ( Page 105 details the making of the silencer ).

With best wishes from England.
Pattern making for the restoration of vintage Dennis Fire Engines


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