Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

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newraiseuser
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Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby newraiseuser » Fri Feb 02, 2018 5:42 pm

Hello, I am planning to buy a large volume 3D printer such as the N2+ to use in my small bedroom at home. However, I am concerned about health-related issues during 3D printing of any printers. I read that even when printing using PLA, some kind of toxic particles are generated which could cause cancer. Has any users done anything to filter out those toxic particles? Are there 3rd party filtration system that could be put besides the printer to absorb those harmful particles? Pictures showing the setup would be nice.

I heard that although there are talks among filament manufacturers to make toxic-free filaments, there is no such product yet. If it does exist, please let us know.

I talked to people at a store that sells Raise3D's printers. He suggested cutting a hole at the back of the printer and install a fan in it. Then, connect the hole to the window using flexible aluminum pipe. Not sure if that would affect the print quality or void the warranty. Any idea?

As for the N2 and N2+, what kind of certifications do they have? Do they have CE, FCC, WEE i and C-Tick certified?

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Michael.P@Raise3D
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby Michael.P@Raise3D » Fri Feb 02, 2018 6:07 pm

Generally with that kind of a modification to the printer (cutting a hole and using venting) you will loose warranty and it will affect the printing capability's depending on material being printed. Another method to try would be to drop a fan and filter inside the machine and allow it to filter the air without loosing heat. Im sure our community will be happy to step in and advise on their preferred filament manufacturers.

We are FCC and CE certified for WEE and C-Tick I am not sure at the moment. (Not something I typically get asked)
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newraiseuser
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby newraiseuser » Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:13 am

A local reseller suggested that modification. Better not to listen to him then.

I am very interested in the 2nd method you mentioned. Could other community members please advice? Perhaps also with photos about the setup? Thanks.

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Julia Truchsess
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby Julia Truchsess » Sat Feb 03, 2018 10:28 pm

FYI and FWIW, this is the only thorough study I'm aware of:

http://www.z-temp.co/Emissions%20from%2 ... inters.pdf

It shows PLA emitting a 2-3 orders of magnitude fewer ultra-fine particles and 1-2 orders of magnitude fewer VOCs than ABS.

newraiseuser
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby newraiseuser » Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:23 am

Yes, I am aware of that study. It seems to show that although PLA emits much less toxic particles than ABS, it still does. The situation is that 3D printing at home or in small office is relative new. There are not enough data to show the long-term effect on health. I guess those who use it in poorly ventilated room are kind of guinea pigs. We won't know what could happen until it is too late. Better be safe than sorry.

I am very interested in hearing effective solutions from other users. There are filtration systems that could enclose the N2+ but those are about $3000. Michael.P mentioned about dropping a filter and a fan inside the machine. Has anybody done it? I wonder if it is effective to make use of the top cover by adding a fan and a filter there. I don't know if it will affect print quality.

newraiseuser
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby newraiseuser » Sun Feb 04, 2018 4:03 pm

Enclosed is my environment for your better understanding of my situation. I think that even I exchange the location of the desk and the bed (under the window) and then put the N2+ on top of the desk so that it is as close to the window as possible, the fume may not leave to the outside. The air could even blow the fume back to my room and other part of the condo. Having the top cover removed for the purpose of printing PLA may affect the printing as the cold air could affect the inner temperature of the printer. As the condo does not allow modification of the windows, I guess the most I could do (after figuring out how to get the fume out of the printer) is to place the other open ending of an aluminum duct to face the window temporarily whenever I print. Perhaps also put cartoon box paper to temporarily cover the other parts of the top window to prevent the toxic particles from blowing in my room. Even so, it might not be an effective solution.

As for putting the printer in the bathroom, it is too big to prevent the door from closing. I don't think the ventilation is strong enough to take out the fume. It might work as those are nano-particles. Nobody knows for sure without testing using special equipment.
Attachments
environment.jpg

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DrewPetitclerc
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby DrewPetitclerc » Tue Feb 06, 2018 1:34 am

I got my hands on a replacement filter and fan assembly that would normally come in a Afinia H800+ and adapted it for use in any printer enclosure that has room for it to rest inside.
20180205_171851.jpg

20180205_171922.jpg

It uses a replacement filter found here:
https://www.octave.com/3d-printer-acces ... p-box.html
20180205_171903.jpg

I found an old power supply of the right voltage and wired it to the fan.
I then added some rubber tubing to the 2 screw ends and one stick on rubber pad for feet.
20180205_171933.jpg

I can place it into the enclosure and it cycles the air through the filter cleaning it without introducing cooler air if I do not want it to.
20180205_172009.jpg
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DrewPetitclerc
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby DrewPetitclerc » Tue Feb 06, 2018 1:44 am

Here is another location that works well.
20180205_172037.jpg

I also forgot to mention it does wonders to stop my wife from commenting on the plastic smell in my shop.
For those wondering how to get one you may have to make one.
I have a 3D CAD file of the 2 part filter housing I created that I may share if you are kind.
The blower fan is fairly common and you can get the part number from my pictures, as to a power supply, I collect them as bases for my fun projects so I had to dig awhile through the box to find one with the right specs.
Or you can make your own, lots of ways to skin the beast!
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Billucas
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby Billucas » Tue Feb 06, 2018 2:53 am


newraiseuser
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby newraiseuser » Thu Feb 08, 2018 4:10 pm

I am trying to decide where to put the N2+. To create good quality prints using PLA, it is recommended to take away the top cover. Given the small size of my room and poor ventilation, where is the best place to put the printer? I guess there are a few options:

1. On the floor under the big window.

2. Put a desk in front (in parallel) to the window and then the printer on top of it. Since the printer is so tall, the opening of the printer should be close to or nearly next to the top sliding window. Hopefully the fume generated by the printer could leave from the top opening to the outside via the small window. Not sure if adding a window fan to suck out the fume would help. I am concerned that this might lead to poor quality prints given the cold weather and the wind could affect the temperature of the build volume. Perhaps experienced users could comment on this?

3. There is a wall surrounding each side of the window. Similar to Idea 2 but put the desk perpendicular to the window (i.e. current position shown in the photo or move the desk to the opposite side). When the printer is put on the desk, the top opening will be near the top window but not exactly under it.

4. Somewhere on the floor along a wall in the middle of the room.

5. Open to suggestions

Any comments appreciated. Thank you.

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Vicky@Raise3D
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby Vicky@Raise3D » Fri Feb 09, 2018 2:14 am

If you put the N2+ on the table, then loading filament and checking print result will be not such convenient to check at the start of printing.

newraiseuser
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby newraiseuser » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:43 pm

Vicky@Raise3D wrote:If you put the N2+ on the table, then loading filament and checking print result will be not such convenient to check at the start of printing.


Thanks for the reminder. I will need to stand on a chair to do that.

EL Cuajinais
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby EL Cuajinais » Fri Feb 16, 2018 9:08 pm

I’m very interested in this subject as well because I moved to the US to a community of rental houses where I don’t have an outside shack. And even if I did have one, I would not be climate controlled so I would think printing during the winter months would not be good. What does everyone here do? Just print inside the house and hope that it does not affect your health? Or print outside but shut down the printer during winter months? I used to live in Puerto Rico where I printed outside year-round. I’m planning on finally setting up my printer this weekend; current plan is to print only PLA while I sort this out. But it’s a shame since I have about 4 additional materials and PLA happens to be the one I like least (smells good though).

Also I can see a scenario where I print in other materials while everyone else is at work/school and monitor the print with the camera I had for this purpose. But even this way, I do wonder is the bad stuff gets suspended in the air for a long time or if the central AC of the house will take care of the particles before everyone gets home.

EL Cuajinais
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby EL Cuajinais » Wed Feb 21, 2018 12:52 am

Has anyone here tried this?
http://www.zimple3d.com

I also saw this review from a Raise3D user no less:
https://ourdiyadventures.com/2017/08/09 ... ir-filter/

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Michael.P@Raise3D
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Re: Has any user done anything to address health-related issues during 3D printing?

Postby Michael.P@Raise3D » Wed Feb 21, 2018 1:06 am

While not exactly scientific, I have been printing and been around printers for the better part of 9 years now in the FDM desktop market. To date I have not had much in the way of physical health issues related to the emissions of printers. This is with at least 4 years of working and living with printers about 16-18 hours a day. This is not to say people should not heed caution and vent any fumes they can but I dont think it should be a show stopper by any means.

For printing in colder climates, you will need to insulate the printer further than the top cover and shutting the doors being that the ambient temperature will affect the bed and nozzle quite a bit.

A side note, for some one who is 6'2" having the N2+ at 22" off the floor is the perfect height for working with it!
Michael Petitclerc, Technician
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